Failure to upgrade Reporting Services 2005 to SP2

Don’t even bother to troubleshoot if this is a new installation. My defective install was SQL2005 Standard RTM where I applied SP2 after a few reboots (so I think Windows Update may have been modifying things).

Install a new instance (you only need a new SQL instance and a new RS instance)
Immediately run SP2, but only on the new SQL and RS instance.
Run the “Reporting Service Configuration” Tool.
Read this KB article. to deal with configuring IIS7.

My new install was SQL 2005 Developers Edition. All of this was on Windows Server 2008 running as a workstation (i.e. not a member of a domain)

Afterwards, permanently turn off the old RS instance. You may not be able to uninstall it.

Reporting Services, of all the SQL components has given me the most trouble in all editions for all time since I ever started using it. The highly technical explanation for the problem is that Installation/Uninstallation/Update code for SSRS is crap.

Just in case anyone was curious here was my error message:

MSI (s) (3C:34) [12:55:51:479]: Product: Microsoft SQL Server 2005 Reporting Services – Update ‘Service Pack 2 for SQL Server Reporting Services 2005 ENU (KB921896)’ installed successfully.

MSI (s) (3C:34) [12:55:51:480]: Windows Installer installed an update. Product Name: Microsoft SQL Server 2005 Reporting Services. Product Version: 9.2.3042.00. Product Language: 1033. Update Name: Service Pack 2 for SQL Server Reporting Services 2005 ENU (KB921896). Installation success or error status: 0.

MSI (s) (3C:34) [12:55:51:481]: Note: 1: 1728
MSI (s) (3C:34) [12:55:51:482]: Transforming table Error.

MSI (s) (3C:34) [12:55:51:482]: Note: 1: 2262 2: Error 3: -2147287038
MSI (s) (3C:34) [12:55:51:498]: Transforming table Error.

MSI (s) (3C:34) [12:55:51:502]: Transforming table Error.

MSI (s) (3C:34) [12:55:51:502]: Note: 1: 2262 2: Error 3: -2147287038
MSI (s) (3C:34) [12:55:51:503]: Transforming table Error.

MSI (s) (3C:34) [12:55:51:503]: Note: 1: 2262 2: Error 3: -2147287038
MSI (s) (3C:34) [12:55:51:503]: Transforming table Error.

MSI (s) (3C:34) [12:55:51:503]: Note: 1: 2262 2: Error 3: -2147287038
MSI (s) (3C:34) [12:55:51:504]: Transforming table Error.

MSI (s) (3C:34) [12:55:51:504]: Note: 1: 2262 2: Error 3: -2147287038
MSI (s) (3C:34) [12:55:51:520]: Transforming table Error.

MSI (s) (3C:34) [12:55:51:524]: Transforming table Error.

MSI (s) (3C:34) [12:55:51:524]: Note: 1: 2262 2: Error 3: -2147287038
MSI (s) (3C:34) [12:55:51:525]: Transforming table Error.

MSI (s) (3C:34) [12:55:51:525]: Note: 1: 2262 2: Error 3: -2147287038
MSI (s) (3C:34) [12:55:51:525]: Transforming table Error.

MSI (s) (3C:34) [12:55:51:525]: Note: 1: 2262 2: Error 3: -2147287038
MSI (s) (3C:34) [12:55:51:525]: Product: Microsoft SQL Server 2005 Reporting Services — Configuration completed successfully.

Stsadm for hard core users- Installing Templates with Powershell

There is an easy way to install the WSS3.0 templates this posted on a forum. But I wanted to try to use powershell to do it. And then the errors started.

Real hard core users can tell if they are pasting ANSI or UNICODE parameters and can see if that is an em dash or an en dash or some other character.

While trying to install ApplicationTemplateCore.wsp, I kept getting “Command line error”, plus a books worth of useless command listing.

This post gave me the clue that works.

Instead of copy/pasting from the readme/MSDN page, retype by hand. I guess this ensures that whitespace and character encoding isn’t anything that Stsadm can’t deal with.

Fortunately, this isn’t a bug because most SharePoint admins have super vision and can see the electrons moving around in the computers memory so they can determine if

“stsadm -o addsolution -filename ApplicationTemplateCore.wsp”

is ANSI, Unicode or what have you.

Here is the script that eventually worked.

stsadm -o addsolution -filename e:\download_temp\ApplicationTemplateCore.wsp
stsadm -o deploysolution -name ApplicationTemplateCore.wsp -allowgacdeployment -local
stsadm -o copyappbincontent

Here is the powershell script to install all the templates.

foreach ($i in get-childitem E:\download_temp\*.wsp) {
     if(!($i.Name -eq "ApplicationTemplateCore.wsp)){
    stsadm -o addsolution -filename $i
    if($i.Name -eq "InventoryTracking.wsp" -or
       $i.Name -eq "DocumentLibraryReview.wsp" -or
       $i.Name -eq "RoomEquipmentReservations.wsp" 
       ){
       stsadm -o deploysolution -name $i.Name -local -allowgacdeployment
    }
    else
    {
       stsadm -o deploysolution -name $i.Name -local
    }
      }
}

Why there is a shortage of SharePoint Developers

You *must* use Windows Server 03/08 as your development workstation (either by installing on a partition or in a VPC).

You *must* do development on a machine with a full installation copy of SharePoint (and installing that is no minor feat, especially to enable the peripheral features like email integration, etc).

You *must* install Visual Studio 2005 + sharepoint related extensions, both the WSS and MOSS SDKs and these must be on the Windows Server as mentioned earlier.

You *may not* do web style development, i.e. you may not have your development environment on one machine and the server on the other. If you try, you will quickly learn that off server you suffer from crappy connectivity challenges, no debug support, no deploy support, and most importantly no IJW technology. Off server It Just *does’t* Work and you need to be a SharePoint genius to know in advance the numerous steps to deploy code to SharePoint.

Another consequence of this is that developers can’t get into the field by purchasing a SharePoint hosting account. Even if he was going to spend the $30-$50 a month for a sharepoint account, he’d have to still set up the entire sharepoint server environment locally to develop for the hosted account! This is a world apart from ASP.NET development.

Consequences: Licensing become a challenge. Doing all the above 100% legally for a developer who just wants to learn is going to be expensive.

The most important challenge, the time to “Hello World” is so great, the typical developer who has maybe a day or an evening to try out a new technology will never get to “Hello World” and will stop attempting to use sharepoint.

The result? Microsoft has successfully marketed the server and forgotten the developers. Please, someone send Steve Balmer over to the SharePoint building so they can be reminded that just because customers pay the bills, it’s developers that decided in the long run who will remain customers.

Reset Vista’s GUI to XP

Why this does exist as a single step operation, I don’t know. XP introduced themes so that people could personalize their computer. Microsoft does seem to understand that I never wanted to have a flash GUI for my work machine. I want boring!

1. Replace Vista’s copy command. Download TeraCopy.

2. Disable UAC.

3. Disable Aero, set classic theme, start menu and taskbar.

4. Set folder view to classic.

5. Fix System Restore Size (which grows to fill up you harddrive under normal usage).